SO … you have built a recording studio. You have nearly killed yourself and who knows how many others, building it. You have invested a ton of dough in a gorgeous classic recording console. The techs have charged you a zillion dollars installing it. It’s time to turn it ON …

This is what you do….

  1. Remove every module that you can from the frame and set them aside in an orderly fashion. Perhaps you might want to put a number on the side of each module so you can return it to its original position. TAKE A PICTURE of the console before you pull it apart, so you can return everything to the right slots.
  2. Turn on the power supply, stand back, and smell for burning components … no bad smell? Cool … go to #3. Bad smell? Not good; call tech.
  3. Measure the power supply voltages at the console (you need to measure at the pins of the individual connectors). EVERY connector needs to show a consistent voltage. For example, in an 80 series Neve, it would be 24 volts, in an API it would be 16. You need to verify that every single connector is showing the correct voltages on the correct pins … OK? Go to #4. Not Ok? Call tech.
  4. Put ONE module in place. Measure the voltage at the console power supply connector to verify that it remains correct.
  5. Using the patch bay, run a tone into the module and check that it is actually passing signal and functioning correctly.
  6. Remove that module and put every module into that slot, and verify that they are functioning and not pulling down the supply below spec
  7. Use one set of modules that are verified functional, and go through each channel position on the console to verify performance in that slot.
  8. Ok, assuming everything is working as specified, go ahead and add the balance of the modules. I suggest adding them 4 at a time and measuring the power supply voltages at the console power supply connector as you do it.
  9. Have a tech genius check the phase on every single possible patch point and connector in the entire studio!

Plug in your mics and record Louie Louie … 🙂